Each month, celebrity hairstylist and Attitude Hair and Grooming expert Jason Collier is sharing his wealth of experience to help keep you looking razor-sharp and ready for any occasion…

As international designers unveiled the full gamut of hot new-season looks on the Autumn/Winter catwalks, so too hair trends – which will be spotted on the streets before the new styles hit stores – gave plenty of scope for inspiration.

Spanning the generations, with a nod to everything from the rockabilly rebels of the ’50s to the laidback looks of the ’70s, 21st-century hair has lots to offer.

Read on for my round-up of how to switch up your hair for the new season as we ease ourselves into autumn…

Crops and comfort

 

 

Off-duty and away from work, comfort was a key look for many designers and padded jackets got their slot in the spotlight once again: Balenciaga teamed a cropped puffa with loose, oversized trousers and kept hair closely cropped to match. Both short and textured crops – which can work well for those with a receding hairline – were spotted on a number of other runways.

 

Lanvin, Dolce & Gabbana, and Dior Homme all featured a variety of cropped looks, with D&G opting for a high-shine look. You might think short hair equals quick and easy styling, but although going shorter will reduce styling time, maintenance is still required. Regular trims are a must to avoid straying into unkempt territory, while a slick of American Crew Pomade provides hold and shine.

Rockabilly riot

Taking inspiration from the 1950s, think icons such as James Dean and Elvis, rockabilly style saw a bit of a resurgence. Belstaff’s vintage-look leather jackets were teamed with hair cropped in at the back and left longer and looser on top; a quiff minus the product and solid feel of old, making it a much more wearable option.

Fringe benefits

Fringes, both blunt cut and ‘curtain’ style (a central parting, which requires longer hair on top) were spotted on the Dior Homme runway. Fringe styles from short and high on the forehead, to longer, with the ends sitting at brow level, were a key look. Again, it’s a look that needs a regular trim to keep the fringes in check, Baxter of California’s Grooming Lotion is a useful tool when it comes to styling with a light touch. It’s a multi-tasking cream that will moisturise hair while controlling frizz and flyaways.

Talking texture

Tousled hair was all over the runway at the Yohji Yamamoto. An easy-going style, you have to get the balance right between a just-out-of-bed look and uncared for though. Use a volumising product, such as a mousse or a spray for root lift, before blow-drying hair roughly, using your fingers to help get air in at the roots for added lift.

Hanz De Fuko’s Quicksand, which is part styling wax and part dry shampoo, and is great for textured styles, particularly if you are looking for a high hold that will last – particularly good for second-day use, simply rub a small amount between fingertips and apply to hair for lift and texture.

Great lengths

Shoulder-length hair was spotted on the Alexander McQueen, Acne and Prada runways. Layers and texture are key here, and product will help, particularly if you have fine hair. A texture and volume-boosting sea salt spray will help you get that ‘effortless’ beachy wave look.

The John Varvatos Fall show had a combination of short crops, closely fitted wool hats, and longer hair, again with plenty of volume, but with less texture and more emphasis on shine. A styling cream works well on longer hair – it’s lightweight, so doesn’t feel heavy on hair but it will help with styling. It’s also good for taming any flyaway hairs – comb a little through hair to prevent frizz.

And if all else fails and you are simply having a bad hair day, that French classic, the beret, was spotted on models at Prada and Moschino, so find a colour that suits and keep it to hand to give yourself a head start.

Jason Collier is an award-winning hair colourist and stylist to the stars, and Creative Director at the Matthew Curtis Hair Salon at The Rosewood London. For more visit jason-collier.co.uk and follow him on Twitter and Instagram.