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JK Rowling responds after address 'leaked' during pro-trans protest outside home

The Harry Potter author has made headlines for her views on sex and gender.

2021-11-22

Words: Alastair James; pictures: Wiki

JK Rowling has responded after trans supporters protested outside the author’s home in Edinburgh, 'leaking' her address in the process.

The now-deleted image of Holly Stars, Richard Energy, and Georgia Frost holding signs supporting trans rights has circulated around social media since being uploaded on Friday 19 November.

Rowling's address was visible in the background of the image on a gatepost. Her place of residence has been in the public domain for many years.

Stars, Energy and Frost have since taken their image down and posted a statement on Instagram saying they stand by the photo but had removed it after receiving abuse and transphobic messages.

"I’ve now received so many death threats"

The Harry Potter author says she was ‘doxxed’ – where someone’s identifiable details are posted online – in a Twitter thread today (Monday 22 November) where she also said: "They should have reflected on the fact that I’ve now received so many death threats I could paper the house with them".

Rowling has previously opened up about some of the abuse she’s received for her views on sex and gender.

Last year, the writer mocked men who menstruate and published an essay where she cited concerns about single-sex spaces such as bathrooms and changing rooms and that she has "deep concerns about the effect the trans rights movement".

Since then, she has said “hundreds of trans activists have threatened to beat, rape, assassinate and bomb me,” while doubling down on her views.

Harry Potter stars Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson are among those to have come out against the author’s views.

They will next be seen in a special reunion programme, Return to Hogwarts, celebrating 20 years since the release of the first film in the Harry Potter series, The Philosopher’s Stone.

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